fbpx

Search Results

Searched for: organic red potatoes 2

New Seward-made Items in Stores

Our staff works hard year-round to make great food for our owners and shoppers. Seward employees bring new ideas and recipes to the Seward Co-op Creamery Café production kitchen, so what’s in stores is always fresh and fits the season.

Look for these and other new Seward-made items this winter.

Sausage

Garlic Kielbasa
Seward-made Garlic Kielbasa is half beef, half pork and features local Community Foods producer Peterson Craftsman Meats in Osceola, Wisconsin. In Poland, the sausage is known as wiejska, which means rural. Paprika and marjoram give classic kielbasa flavor to ours. It’s smoked hot over cherry and hickory wood. Pair with scalloped potatoes, cabbage, stew, sauerkraut and onions.

Swedish Potato Sausage
Yukon Gold potatoes make this Scandinavian holiday sausage light and fluffy. In Sweden, it’s known as potatis korv and is cooked by poaching the links and then browning lightly in butter. The Swedish Potato Sausage is crafted using pork from local Community Foods producer Peterson Craftsman Meats in Osceola, Wisconsin. The sausage is seasoned mildly with white pepper, nutmeg and bay leaf—and pairs with casserole, stew, pickled herring and sauteed mushrooms.

Sweet Spanish Sausage
Launching Dec. 15, this traditional Catalan sausage—called Butifarra Dulce—is popular during the winter holiday season. The flavors are reminiscent of egg nog, only enhanced by the traditional cooking method of poaching in water or sweet wine with cinnamon and lemon zest. This sausage features pork and honey from Community Foods producers Peterson Craftsman Meats and The Beez Kneez, as well as sherry, heavy cream, salt, black peppercorn, grains of paradise, lemon zest and sweet cinnamon. Pair with caramelized apples, polenta, braised kale and chickpeas and Tortilla Española.

Haggis Sausage
Enjoy a taste of Robert Burns Day (Jan. 25) with haggis, the national dish of Scotland that inspired this limited-run sausage. Serve with turnips and potatoes—or roasted carrots from Featherstone Farm, a local Community Foods producer in Rushford, Minnesota.

Bakery


Caramel Shortbread
Our bakery staff whipped up this twist on a popular crunchy caramel candy bar. Seward-made Caramel Shortbread is sweet and rich, with buttery caramel and dark chocolate on a tender crust and garnished with toasted pecan and finishing salt. The dairy, flour and chocolate are sourced from Community Foods producers.

Chocolate Hazelnut Biscotti
This might as well be called the Community Foods biscotti, as the chocolate, flour and butter used to make it are from vendors who are part of the program. It’s rich, nutty and chocolatey (of course), with hints of toasted hazelnut, coffee and spice. Dip in a coffee or an Egg Nog Latte—both available at the Deli counter right by the baked goods.

Grab & Go

Mushroom Stroganoff
With 19th-century Russian origins, stroganoff has become a tradition in Minnesota. Ours is rich, creamy and well-seasoned and includes ingredients sourced primarily from Community Foods vendor Co-op Partners Warehouse and Albert’s Organics: shiitake mushrooms, vegetable stock, bow tie pasta, white wine, sour cream, all-purpose flour, butter, garlic, salt, yellow onion, thyme and black pepper.

Vegan Mac and “Cheese”
A comfort food favorite made without the ingredient that is its namesake. Ace Fox, production shift lead, perfected the recipe at home before introducing it to Grab & Go. “It’s made with a combination of soaked cashews, coconut milk, boiled vegetables and nutritional yeast, which gives it the creamy texture that people might miss about cheese,” Ace said. “It’s a great alternative for those of us who don’t consume dairy.” Local Community Foods producer Heartbeet Farm in Zumbro Falls, Minnesota, provides the carrots and potatoes for this recipe.

Recipe: Seward-Made Sausage Meets Seasonal Produce

This aromatic cabbage, sauerkraut, sausage stew hails from central Europe and is Poland’s national dish. It brings together some of our favorite seasonal items that also happen to be on sale at Seward Co-op through Oct. 16. Seward-made Nürnberger sausage is $2 off per pound for everyone and organic gala apples from Hoch Orchard in La Crescent, Minnesota, are $1.50 off per pound for co-op owners. Visit our specials page for more ways to save.

Sausage and Cabbage Stew
Total Time: 1 hour 15 minutes
Servings: 8

Ingredients
2 tablespoons canola oil
12 ounces Seward-made Nürnberger sausage, cut into 2-inch pieces
1/2 pound smoked ham, cut into 1-inch cubes
1/2 large yellow onion, diced (about 1 cup)
2 garlic cloves, minced
4 ounces mushrooms, cut in 1/2-inch slices
1/2 pound green cabbage, shredded
1/2 pound sauerkraut, drained
1 apple, diced (about 1 1/2 cups)
1 can (14.5 ounces) diced tomatoes
1/2 teaspoon allspice
1/2 teaspoon ground black pepper

Preparation
In a large stockpot or Dutch oven, heat the canola oil over medium heat. Brown the pieces of sausage and smoked ham. Add the onions and garlic and sauté for several minutes until the onion starts to soften. Add the remaining ingredients and stir well. Lower the heat, cover and continue to cook for 45 minutes. Stir every 10 minutes or so to prevent sticking.

Serving Suggestion
Traditionally, this stew is served with potatoes and rye bread, and is often made a day ahead of time, allowing the flavors to mingle overnight. Deviled eggs or creamed herring are served as an appetizer with this dish. For a lighter meal, add a fresh green salad, or lightly-steamed broccoli, carrots, or green beans.

Recipe courtesy of National Co-op Grocers.

Produce At Its Peak: Chestnuts

Chestnut trees once made up a significant portion of North America’s hardwood forests. The nuts were widely eaten by Native Americans and later by European immigrants, until the chestnut blight of the 1930s, which nearly eliminated the American chestnut tree. There has been a recent revival with the planting of blight resistant breeds from Europe or Asia. Chestnuts sold at Seward are organically grown on Chinese chestnut trees in Iowa by Bill Brookhiser and his family.

Technically a nut, chestnuts are low in oil (9% compared with walnuts at 83%), high in water content, and nutritionally resemble grains because of their high carbohydrate content. Select tight, shiny, dark brown nuts that feel heavy for their size. Fresh chestnuts should be stored in the refrigerator in a paper bag for around a week.

Chestnuts are an incredibly versatile nut. While many are familiar with roasted chestnuts, they may also be boiled, mashed, candied or pureed – and used in both savory and sweet applications.

When roasting score an “x” on side of the shells with a paring knife, soak in hot water for a few minutes, then roast for 15-20 minutes until you begin to see the shell peel back along the scored lines. Peel while warm and be sure to remove the thin inner skin. I love to roast up a few pockets full before heading out for a brisk autumn walk – peeling as I go to warm the hands and the belly.

To mash, puree, or sauté, score the flat side of the shell and simmer in water for 15 minutes. Remove both the outer shell and the inner skin. Return to the pan to simmer further until soft for a puree or mash – enjoy as a side on its own or mixed with potatoes, butter, and cream for a nutty variation on the traditional mash. To sauté, finish in a hot buttered pan with garlic and halved Brussels sprouts.

For a chestnut stuffing, either roast or boil 1 pound of chestnuts before removing the shell and inner skin. Then simmer in 2 cups of vegetable broth for 20 minutes. Remove from heat and stir in 1 cup of dried cranberries – let sit for 5 minutes. In a large saucepan, brown wedges of two large onions. In a large bowl combine the chestnut mixture with 10 cups cubed dry or toasted whole grain bread, the browned onions, chopped parsley, thyme, and sage. Add 1 ½ cups of broth and salt and pepper. Bake in a shallow baking dish at 325 degrees F for 45 minutes.

Produce At Its Peak: Chestnuts

Chestnut trees once made up a significant portion of North America’s hardwood forests. The nuts were widely eaten by Native Americans and later by European immigrants, until the chestnut blight of the 1930s, which nearly eliminated the American chestnut tree. There has been a recent revival with the planting of blight resistant breeds from Europe or Asia. This year, Seward shoppers will find local chestnuts from Badgersett Farm out of Canton, Minn. on Seward shelves.

Badgersett Research farm grows chestnut, pecan and hazelnut trees using sustainable and organic methods. With roots going back to 1978, Badgersett Research Corporation works on bringing “Woody Agriculture” into the mainstream world of full scale staple food production. Local pecans are certainly a novelty, these are the farthest north growing trees.

Technically a nut, chestnuts are low in oil (9% compared with walnuts at 83%), high in water content, and nutritionally resemble grains because of their high carbohydrate content. Select tight, shiny, dark brown nuts that feel heavy for their size. Fresh chestnuts should be stored in the refrigerator in a paper bag for around a week.

Chestnuts are an incredibly versatile nut. While many are familiar with roasted chestnuts, they may also be boiled, mashed, candied or pureed – and used in both savory and sweet applications.

When roasting score an “x” on side of the shells with a paring knife, soak in hot water for a few minutes, then roast for 15-20 minutes until you begin to see the shell peel back along the scored lines. Peel while warm and be sure to remove the thin inner skin. I love to roast up a few pockets full before heading out for a brisk autumn walk – peeling as I go to warm the hands and the belly.

To mash, puree, or sauté, score the flat side of the shell and simmer in water for 15 minutes. Remove both the outer shell and the inner skin. Return to the pan to simmer further until soft for a puree or mash – enjoy as a side on its own or mixed with potatoes, butter, and cream for a nutty variation on the traditional mash. To sauté, finish in a hot buttered pan with garlic and halved Brussels sprouts.

For a chestnut stuffing, either roast or boil 1 pound of chestnuts before removing the shell and inner skin. Then simmer in 2 cups of vegetable broth for 20 minutes. Remove from heat and stir in 1 cup of dried cranberries – let sit for 5 minutes. In a large saucepan, brown wedges of two large onions. In a large bowl combine the chestnut mixture with 10 cups cubed dry or toasted whole grain bread, the browned onions, chopped parsley, thyme, and sage. Add 1 ½ cups of broth and salt and pepper. Bake in a shallow baking dish at 325 degrees F for 45 minutes.

Produce At Its Peak: Summer Squash

Summer Squash

Image

Did you know summer squash is not really a vegetable? The many varieties of summer squash are a type of “pepo”, or hard-walled berry that are harvested while the rind is still tender and edible. Summer squash is in season now and we are carrying at least five varieties (green and gold zucchini, crookneck, zephyr-my personal favorite for its sweetness-, patty pan, and calabacita, a small tender zucchini). Wisconsin Growers Co-op, Featherstone Farm, Heartbeet Farms, and Sin Fronteras are delivering these squash multiple times each week. Select firm, unwrinkled, evenly shaped squash and store in your crisper drawer.

Sin Fronteras

Image

Sin Fronteras (Without Borders) is a Stillwater, Minn-based family-farm growing fresh, healthy Latino food. Farmers Eduardo Rivera and Madeline Shaw bring to the Twin Cities sustainably grown and at times challenging to find varieties of chile peppers, tomatillos, and espasote along with familiar roots, greens, and herbs. These foods can be found at area coops, the Linden Hills Farmers Market, and through a culturally appropriate Latino CSA. Look to their Facebook page for recipes using Sin Fronteras produce.

Wisconsin Growers Co-op

Wisconsin Growers Co-op was founded in 2006 to help 20 families maintain ownership of their farms. Its members are dedicated to the idea that if farmers take “good care of the soil, the soil will pay back with high-quality produce.” This mindset has proven effective; Wisconsin Growers often brings us produce all year long, from greenhouse radishes at the first sight of spring clear around the calendar to over-wintered parsnips. The key to the longevity of their growing season are labor-intensive, fossil fuel-free farming methods. On nearly 40 acres of the co-op’s land, these farmers plant, tend, and harvest crops exclusively using horses, horse machinery, and hand tools. In addition to more popular produce items such as potatoes, onions, and radishes, the Wisconsin Growers Co-op offers unique heirloom squash varieties, such as Queensland blue and Long Island cheese.

Featherstone Fruits and Vegetables

Featherstone Fruits and Vegetables started in 1995 as Jack Hedin and Jenni McHugh’s five-acre garden at the Zephyr Valley Land Co-op near Winona, Minn. Since then, the farm has relocated to land near the town of Rushford, Minn., and now employs nearly 50 people working on over 250 acres of optimal vegetable-growing ground. Beginning in late May with leaf lettuce, through a summer’s harvest of zucchini and cherry tomatoes, into winter squash and carrots in the winter, there’s hardly a month that Featherstone isn’t represented in the co-op’s Produce department. The farm is certified organic and is dedicated to creating a truly sustainable agriculture system. That includes geothermal heating and cooling for the packing shed, as well as a solar array that generates about 60 percent of the farm’s energy. Featherstone Farm also operates a large community-supported agriculture program.

Heartbeet Farm

Image

Heartbeet Farm is a family farm owned and operated by Joe and Rebecca Schwen. Located in Zumbro Falls, Minn, the fields that now comprise Heartbeet Farm are the same fields that Joe was raised on and where he learned to farm. Recently, Joe and Rebecca have begun to cooperatively market their produce as Heartbeet Farms along with two nearby small family farms: Easy Yoke and Hare & Tortoise. Working together allows these farms to operate at a scale that enables them to directly interact with the plants, soil, animals, and farm ecosystem while still being productive, efficient, and sustainable. They employ a combination of draft horses, small tractors, woodstove heated greenhouses, and other technologies to grow a wide variety of vegetables. Look for beets, shiso, Hakurei turnips, and many other items from Heartbeet Farms throughout the growing season. All three farms are dedicated to farming in a healthful, holistic, and sustainable way and are certified organic.

Produce At Its Peak: Summer Squash

Summer Squash

Did you know summer squash is not really a vegetable? The many varieties of summer squash are a type of “pepo”, or hard-walled berry that are harvested while the rind is still tender and edible. Summer squash is in season now and we are carrying at least five varieties (green and gold zucchini, crookneck, zephyr-my personal favorite for its sweetness-, patty pan, and calabacita, a small tender zucchini). Wisconsin Growers Co-op, Featherstone Farm, Heartbeet Farms, and Sin Fronteras are delivering these squash multiple times each week. Select firm, unwrinkled, evenly shaped squash and store in your crisper drawer.

Sin Fronteras

Sin Fronteras (Without Borders) is a Stillwater, Minn-based family-farm growing fresh, healthy Latino food. Farmers Eduardo Rivera and Madeline Shaw bring to the Twin Cities sustainably grown and at times challenging to find varieties of chile peppers, tomatillos, and espasote along with familiar roots, greens, and herbs. These foods can be found at area coops, the Linden Hills Farmers Market, and through a culturally appropriate Latino CSA. Look to their Facebook page for recipes using Sin Fronteras produce.

Wisconsin Growers Co-op

Wisconsin Growers Co-op was founded in 2006 to help 20 families maintain ownership of their farms. Its members are dedicated to the idea that if farmers take “good care of the soil, the soil will pay back with high-quality produce.” This mindset has proven effective; Wisconsin Growers often brings us produce all year long, from greenhouse radishes at the first sight of spring clear around the calendar to over-wintered parsnips. The key to the longevity of their growing season are labor-intensive, fossil fuel-free farming methods. On nearly 40 acres of the co-op’s land, these farmers plant, tend, and harvest crops exclusively using horses, horse machinery, and hand tools. In addition to more popular produce items such as potatoes, onions, and radishes, the Wisconsin Growers Co-op offers unique heirloom squash varieties, such as Queensland blue and Long Island cheese.

Featherstone Fruits and Vegetables

Featherstone Fruits and Vegetables started in 1995 as Jack Hedin and Jenni McHugh’s five-acre garden at the Zephyr Valley Land Co-op near Winona, Minn. Since then, the farm has relocated to land near the town of Rushford, Minn., and now employs nearly 50 people working on over 250 acres of optimal vegetable-growing ground. Beginning in late May with leaf lettuce, through a summer’s harvest of zucchini and cherry tomatoes, into winter squash and carrots in the winter, there’s hardly a month that Featherstone isn’t represented in the co-op’s Produce department. The farm is certified organic and is dedicated to creating a truly sustainable agriculture system. That includes geothermal heating and cooling for the packing shed, as well as a solar array that generates about 60 percent of the farm’s energy. Featherstone Farm also operates a large community-supported agriculture program.

Heartbeet Farm

Heartbeet Farm is a family farm owned and operated by Joe and Rebecca Schwen. Located in Zumbro Falls, Minn, the fields that now comprise Heartbeet Farm are the same fields that Joe was raised on and where he learned to farm. Recently, Joe and Rebecca have begun to cooperatively market their produce as Heartbeet Farms along with two nearby small family farms: Easy Yoke and Hare & Tortoise. Working together allows these farms to operate at a scale that enables them to directly interact with the plants, soil, animals, and farm ecosystem while still being productive, efficient, and sustainable. They employ a combination of draft horses, small tractors, woodstove heated greenhouses, and other technologies to grow a wide variety of vegetables. Look for beets, shiso, Hakurei turnips, and many other items from Heartbeet Farms throughout the growing season. All three farms are dedicated to farming in a healthful, holistic, and sustainable way and are certified organic.

Produce At Its Peak: Over Winter?

The month of March is a time where we see a juxtaposition of fresh, spring vegetables coming from California and Mexico and winter storage crops available from local farms. A perfect pairing of spring and winter crops can be enjoyed with the following recipe; Creamy Asparagus Soup. It’s vegan; the cream comes from one of my favorite potatoes, the German Butterball. We are still getting these golden spuds locally from Driftless Organics in Wisconsin, where Josh and Noah Engle are selling a large bounty of stored potatoes harvested in the fall. Organic asparagus is in season in Mexico and California and we are selling it at the lowest prices I have seen in all my years as Produce Buyer. I would definitely sauté some asparagus to have alongside the soup. In fact, I ate a pound of asparagus last night, simply sautéed in butter with salt and pepper.

Asparagus contains anti-inflammatory phytonutrients as well as anti-oxidants. It contains significant amounts of inulin, fiber and B-vitamins. Inulin is a pre-biotic which helps with digestive issues and inulin also promotes healthy blood sugar levels. Inulin can be found in other foods such as artichokes, bananas, garlic, leeks, onions and sunchokes.
Speaking of sunchokes, I hear the C-op Creamery Café will be featuring overwintered sunchokes from a local farm on their upcoming new Evening menu. Overwintered vegetables have been left in the field during the frozen months and dug in the spring when the ground thaws. Overwintered produce is another great example of the winter to spring transition. Keep an eye out for overwintered parsnips and sunchokes in our stores this spring!

Creamy Asparagus Soup

1 ½ lbs. asparagus spears, trimmed
1 ½ Tbs. olive oil
1 ½ cups finely chopped shallots (about 10)
½ lb. boiling potatoes, peeled and cut into ½-inch cubes
2 vegetable bouillon cubes
1 Tbs. fresh lemon juice
Coarsely ground black pepper for garnish

1. Reserve 8 spears of asparagus for garnish. Cut remaining asparagus stalks into 1-inch pieces.

2. In medium saucepan, heat oil over medium heat. Add shallots and cook, stirring often, until beginning to brown, 8 to 10 minutes. Add potatoes, cut-up asparagus and 4 cups water. Cover and bring to a boil over high heat. Add bouillon and 1 teaspoon salt. Reduce heat and simmer, partially covered, until potatoes are tender, about 10 minutes.

3. Meanwhile, in wide, deep pot of lightly salted boiling water, blanch reserved asparagus spears until just tender, about 3 minutes. Using slotted spoon, remove spears to colander and rinse under cold running water, drain well and set aside.

4. In food processor or blender, process soup in batches until smooth and creamy. Return to pot and add freshly ground pepper to taste and lemon juice. Adjust salt to taste. Garnish with asparagus spears and ground black pepper. Serve hot.

Recipe courtesy of Vegetarian Times