2018 SEED Recipients

2018 SEED Recipients

Sisters' Camelot works to raise awareness about food justice as share free organic food with the community. SEED funds will be used to support Sisters' Camelot's Kitchen Bus.

January: Southside Community Health Services

Southside is a local community clinic and they're working with community partners to offer healthy, locally grown, fresh food to patients through a free "prescription CSA" as a way to reduce chronic health conditions such as diabetes and heart disease.

February: WE WIN Institute, Inc.

WE WIN Institute’s Women of Distinction Social Entrepreneurship project uses urban gardening and community engagement to develop a pathway to post-secondary education for Minneapolis girls of color.

March: Sabathani Community Center

Sabathani provides food, clothing and housing to 26,000 neighborhood residents each year in South Minneapolis. We feed the chronically poor, those on disability or chemical dependent individuals and families. Sabathani Community Center has been providing basic needs services for nearly fifty years.

April: Dream of Wild Health

Dream of Wild Health is a Native American-led, nonprofit farm and youth leadership program. Dream of Wild Health grows indigenous seeds and foods, as well as healthy Native youth leaders who create community change.

May: Walk-In Counseling Center

Walk-In Counseling Center provides free, no-appointment, anonymous mental health and crisis counseling to all, in English and Spanish. Funds will support raising awareness of mental health, and the meeting of increased demand.

June: Sabathani and Brian Coyle Center Food Shelves

Sabathani provides food, clothing and housing to 26,000 neighborhood residents each year in South Minneapolis. We feed the chronically poor, those on disability or chemical dependent individuals and families. Sabathani Community Center has been providing basic needs services for nearly fifty years.

The Brian Coyle food shelf provides healthy and culturally relevant food for the diverse Cedar Riverside neighborhood. The majority cultural communities served are East African and Southeast Asian.

July: Tamles y Bicicletas

The Urban Farming Institute at Tamles y Bicicletas promotes and educates the community on strategies towards eating healthy foods through cultural knowledges of indigenous growing technologies, while promoting healthier lifestyles through innovative, culturally appropriate methods.

August: MADDADS

MAD DADS stands up against gangs, drugs, and crime in our communities. SEED funds will be used to fund community outreach that helps connect people to jobs, drug treatment, housing, health care, and much more.

September: CAPI USA

CAPI’s Asian food shelf provides nearly 400 immigrant and refugee families with access to nutritious food every month.

October: Hmong American Farmers Association

The Hmong American Farmers Association supports Hmong farmers in creating profitable, sustainable agricultural businesses. SEED donations help provide healthy, fresh produce to more than 70,000 schoolchildren and tens of thousands of other neighbors in the Twin Cities region.

November: Brian Coyle Center

The Brian Coyle food shelf provides healthy and culturally relevant food for the diverse Cedar Riverside neighborhood. The majority cultural communities served are East African and Southeast Asian.

December: The Aliveness Project

SEED donations support the Aliveness Project's Food Shelf, which provides groceries to people living with HIV.